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Change of schedule

With Thanksgiving around the corner, many of us will be travelling to visit families and friends starting this coming weekend. Because of this, we have decided to cancel this Saturday’s meeting and push it back to December, which means that every other book on schedule will be pushed back a month.
Here what is ahead of us with these adjustments:
December 16:  Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita
January 20:  Georges Bernanos, The Diary of a Country Priest
February 17:   Paul Claudel, The Tidings brought to Mary; Albert Camus, Caligula
March  23:  Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
Have a great Thanksgiving and happy reading!
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Another season of great books!

Welcome back to Dipso!

We are ready to start another great season of great books! We will dive through St. Augustine’s City of God in September and October, then move on to Bulgakov, Bernanos, Claudel and Camus.

Hope to see you all on September 23!

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Faust and the quest for power and success

“Alas, I have studied philosophy, / the law as well as medicine, / and to my sorrow, theology; / studied them well with ardent zeal, / yet here I am, a wretched fool, / no wiser than I was before.”

“Who are you then?”
“I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust: First Part

Saturday, February 21, we will discuss Dr. Faustus by Marlowe and Faust by Goethe. It’s going to be very interesting!!

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Maps and Illustrations of the Divine Comedy

Here are a couple of websites with great maps and illustrations of the Divine Comedy.

The World of Dante: it provides galleries with illustrations from Thompson, Botticelli, Vellutello, Dore’, and others; great maps of Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso; a timeline, and other resources.

The Divine Comedy Gallery: it has images from various illustrated editions of the Comedy including a very powerful one by Salvador Dali’, maps, and pages from medieval manuscripts.

Here is one last map of Inferno

 

 

 

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Dante in the Year of Mercy

On the occasion of the 750th anniversary of Dante’s birth (May 4, 2015), Pope Francis said that the great Florentine poet “still has much to say and to offer through his immortal works to those who wish to follow the route of true knowledge and authentic discovery of the self, the world and the profound and transcendent meaning of existence.”  He encouraged the faithful to read the Divine Comedy and use it as a spiritual guide during the Holy Year of Mercy. According to the Holy Father, in fact, Dante’s masterpiece  offers an opportunity to “rediscover the lost or obscured meaning of our human path and to hope to see again the glowing horizon on which the dignity of the human person shines in its fullness.”

A free resource to help you seeing the Comedy as a guide to the spiritual life is offered by Dr. Jason Baxter, Assistant Professor of Humanities at Wyoming Catholic College through a series of videos on each Cantica titled Dante in the Year of Mercy . The first one is already available online, while the others will be posted in the upcoming weeks.

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Welcome back!

Welcome back to Dipso!

We hope your summer was relaxing and filled with good books! You didn’t read enough? Don’t worry, here is your chance to improve!

Our first meeting of the 2015-2016 season will be Saturday, September 19, usual time, usual place, 9:30a.m. at Panera Bread. We will tackle one of the greatest works of literature, Dante’s Divine Comedy, starting with the Inferno. As always, if you do not own a copy, you can read it online at Project Gutenberg.

If you are interested in commentaries on this work or additional information on the author, you can check, among many sites, the Dartmouth Dante Project or the Princeton Dante Project.

Enjoy it and see you soon “In the midway of this our mortal life”!

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Manzoni, The Betrothed

If you enjoyed reading The Betrothed as much as I did, you might enjoy watching excerpts of a mini-series that was made by the Italian television in the 1990s. Unfortunately, it is only in Italian, but still, I think it’s worth it!

Here are the links to parts I and III that are available on Youtube:
Part I
Part III

For other, shorter videos that are from specific chapters, you can also check the link below (sorry, the videos are still in Italian). Once you open the page, links will also be on the right hand side:

http://www.scuola.rai.it/articoli/i-promessi-sposi-gli-untori-cap-xxxiv/4225/default.aspx

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King Lear

“Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave
My heart into my mouth. I love your majesty
According to my bond; no more nor less.”

Our sixth meeting will focus on King Lear, one of William Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies. See you on March 21!

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Murdered in the cathedral for the honor of God

“A martyrdom is always the design of God, for His love of men, to warn them and to lead them, to bring them back to His ways. It is never the design of man; for the true martyr is he who has become the instrument of God, who has lost his will in the will of God, and who no longer desires anything for himself, not even the glory of becoming a martyr.” (Murder in the Cathedral)

“We must only do – absurdly – what we have been given to do – right to the end.” (Becket)

We will discuss T.S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral and Jean Anouilh’s Becket on Saturday, February 28.

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A Myth Retold

“The sweetest thing in all my life has been the longing — to reach the Mountain, to find the place where all the beauty came from — my country, the place where I ought to have been born. Do you think it all meant nothing, all the longing? The longing for home? For indeed it now feels not like going, but like going back.”

We will discuss C. S. Lewis’ Till We Have Faces at our next meeting, January 31. Enjoy reading, see you then!

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